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The Law Society Medal

Each year, the Law Society of Ontario awards the Law Society Medal to selected lawyers who have made a significant contribution to the profession.

The award is given for outstanding service within the profession, whether in the area of practice, in the academic sphere, or in some other professional capacity where the service is in accordance with the highest ideals of the legal profession. It may be awarded for devotion to professional duties over a long term or for a single outstanding act of service.

2022 recipients

Beth Beattie Called to the Bar in 1994, Beth Beattie has become an agent of change in the mental health space within the legal professions. She has helped thousands by sharing her lived mental health experience and continues to lead discussions about how to make a cultural change in the legal community when it comes to conversations about mental health. Through her advocacy, Ms. Beattie has made an immeasurable impact by promoting awareness, compassion and inclusion in the legal community and beyond.

Christopher Bredt Called to the Bar in 1984, Christopher Bredt has made exceptional contributions to the legal profession in Ontario through his work with the Law Society, government, legal education, his pro bono and charitable work, and as a practicing lawyer and mentor. He is known as a skilled and fearless advocate, who exemplifies the profession’s values of integrity, collegiality and civility.

Brian Gover Called to the Bar in 1983, Brian Gover is widely recognized as one of Canada’s top advocates. He started his career in public service and moved to private practice in 1994. Mr. Gover is committed to education and mentorship, and has a deep appreciation of how the law works — his healthy curiosity keeps him at the forefront of change.

Lorin MacDonald (She/Her) Called to the Bar in 2010, Lorin MacDonald is a renowned human rights lawyer, disability expert and accessibility inclusion changemaker. Her notable accomplishments include introducing captioning to Western University, various courts and tribunals, and the Law Society of Ontario. A dedicated volunteer, Ms. MacDonald has lent her expertise to the Ontario Courts Accessibility Committee for People with Disabilities and the Law Society’s Equity Advisory Group, among many others.

Deepa Mattoo Called to the Bar of Ontario in 2011 and India in 1998, Deepa Mattoo is described as a “feminist lawyer” — a leader in women's issues. She is currently the Executive Director of the Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic, a multi-service agency in Toronto that provides trauma-informed legal, counselling and interpretation services to racialized and marginalized populations of women.

Professor Albert Oosterhoff Called to the Bar in 1966, Professor Albert Oosterhoff (Professor Emeritus, University of Western Ontario) is renowned as a leading legal scholar and author in the area of trusts and estates in Canada. His publication record spans 50 years and his work is regularly cited by the courts, academics, lawyers, students and policy-makers both nationally and internationally.

Stuart Wuttke Called to the Bar of Manitoba in 1996 and Ontario in 2006, Stuart Wuttke is a leader in Indigenous rights and policy reform. He is a fierce yet humble advocate, dedicated to public service. Mr. Wuttke’s expertise and involvement on the national stage in First Nations law has lent itself to the significant progress for First Nations and the advancement of reconciliation in Canada.


medalHistory of the medal

Originally struck in 1985, the Law Society Medal has been awarded to more than 100 lawyers in recognition of distinguished service.

The Medal is made of sterling silver and is in the shape of a heraldic rose; the petals covered in white enamel. The white rose of York was chosen because it forms part of the Law Society’s coat of arms; it symbolizes the fact that the Law Society's seat was in York County, and that Toronto was called York at the time when Osgoode Hall was created in 1829.

The Law Society's motto, "Let Right Prevail," appears in a red enamel circle in the centre of the rose, surrounded by a stag. The stag came originally from the coat of arms of Sir John Beverly Robinson, an early Treasurer. A beaver was also included as it appears in the Law Society's coat of arms.

Recipients of the Medal are permitted to wear it on appropriate occasions, and can also use the designation LSM (short for Law Society Medal) after their names.

See a list of all recipients of the Law Society Medal.

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